4 Killer Tips for New Leaders to Build Trust

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A great leader is a person who understands people’s psychology and treats them with kindness and care.  An inspired leader can even redesign a low performing employee’s thought patterns and make him or her better employee.  He is a team player who doesn’t believe in doing everything himself but exploit the contributions of each team members to deliver better results. A leader needs only one single ingredient to motivate and inspire employees- trust!  When your team members trust your vision and intentions, they will go out of their way to do great work for you. When people have great faith in you, they will be confident enough to trust in your decisions and strategies. Even when you don’t have a vivid idea about a project, they will work hard to bring more clarity to it.  You need to ensure that your words and actions are in alignment to build trust among your employees.  If you are the team lead or manager, your words and actions contribute to the perception of the organization. Employees lose their drive to work hard when a manager’s words and actions are not in alignment.  It also takes involvement from your side to create a strong bond of trust that super charge your team members to make their organization reach new heights. Here are six tips that will help you to be a better leader at all levels.

Be transparent and honest

Even when it is hard, you need to be honest and transparent with the employees and tell the truth.  If you tell things that people want to hear, you will never achieve the targets.   You must also be sensitive to the employee’s feelings but always check whether their concerns are genuine.   It actually takes a long way to create trust in people as a leader but it is very much possible.   If a team member is not performing well, you need to be honest about that too! You can gently convey the message to him or her and give some tips to boost his performance.  According to Boise Motivational Speakers, the downfall of an employee begins when he or she faces issues in their personal lives.  You can genuinely ask whether there is any issue going on in their life. If possible, you can give advices that can help them.

Hard work helps building trust

Trust is never given but you have to earn it. When you keep your promises and align your actions with the values you represent, trust naturally flourishes!  Building trust is worth all the effort because it gives the team unity and strength.  If your team members trust your vision, they will go out of their way to help you to accomplish a task and it will help you grow as a team.  Every business has to be dealt personally! When you add a personal flavor to your work, every little achievement becomes a reason for celebration.  You can also ask your team mates about their personal life and motivate them to go up in their graph by doing quality work. You can start building trust by meeting as many individual contributors as possible. For remembering the points, you can take a pad and make notes. Listen carefully to each team member.  Meetings can be either one on one or in tiny groups.  These interactions will help building trust in your team members.

Commitment

We all know actions speak louder than words so do what you preach!  People never follow you if you never keep your promises.  It is important not to commit to any tasks which you won’t be able to deliver because your team members will be less likely to trust you after that.  When people feel that you are committed to the cause, they will deliver really great work.

Show consistency in your work

You need to be consistent in keeping your promises.  It will help you build the trust over time.  Occasional fulfillment of your promises never gets the respect of your team mates.  Keeping commitments must be the core of your behavior, in both personal and professional relationships.   If you want to create a good impression in your team, you need to work hard and show them how it’s done.  Your team will take you seriously only if you are serious about your work.

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